Drywall that ceiling

I hate installing drywall. I’m talking about deep down Hate. I’d rather clean cat litterboxes, shovel manure into the tide, go to a party with people, make a doctor’s appointment, anything but drywall.

So it’s safe to say that if I resort to drywall to cover up the damaged tongue and groove ceiling, that there was simply no other way to do it.

The Ugly Beam

There was a corner in the kitchen that had an overhead beam where the roofline, and also the ceiling, changed pitch. It looked fairly large and monstrous but it didn’t actually hold much weight up. It was ugly. Not only was it an eyesore, but I knew it would be a lot of work to take off the old wrapping and put up new boards and make it look nice.

Also in this corner was a hole in the ceiling that looked like it had always been there. How the heck am I supposed to fix that?

This whole corner was ugly. I had to solve that ugly beam to bring it all together.

Nobody likes cabinets over the fridge

That little space above the fridge is a bad, bad place for cabinets with doors. It’s hard to reach, not very big and whatever gets put up there is unseen and quickly forgotten. It may as well be a storage unit in Poughkeepsie.

Sincerely, just do open shelving and have display items up there. Some nice pottery. A metal rooster. A life sized bust of Colonel Sanders. Han Solo frozen in carbonite. A flashing neon BEER sign. Anything but cabinets with doors that close. Dust it every six months. It’s helpful if all that stuff is dishwasher safe. You’re welcome.

Masking Tape

Masking tape is good at holding things together. Better than one might think. Cabinetmakers use it to hold workpieces together when they’re being glued. Here I’m using it to hold the banding against the edge of the plywood for the cabinet shelves. The blue tape has a little lower adhesion than the regular tape so it does less damage to the wood. Regular masking tape can rip splinters of wood off the plywood when you remove it. Now you know! See, you learn things when you read this blog. And there’s no ads, no cookies, I don’t track you, I don’t gather your personal information, and I don’t send crap to your email. I don’t sell your phone number to solicitors. I don’t narc you out to the cops. I don’t tell your boss you’re reading this during work hours. You can just come here and look at pictures and learn things. What a great blog, huh?

It’s a dirty job

That wall has been pleading with me to affix some kitchen cabinets to it for six months. Welp, it’s a lot easier getting that tile up first, otherwise I’m leaning in under the cabinets and whacking my head on them while trying to put tile up. It’s all about getting the cart behind the horse, even if the horse has been standing out in the road with a harness on it since January.

Kitchen Backsplash

I do a band of copper with oak trim, which matches the rest of the kitchen and ties it all together. And we found this midnight blue subway tile to go behind it. It looks kind of boring gray without any direct light on it but we have some undercabinet lighting that will make them shine. And at the same time illuminate every little flaw, defect and error for all the kitchen to see. But it will bring out the color! Have no doubt.

That metal edging is called Schluter. If you’re installing tile on a wall, you want Schluter. Gives it a nice finished edge.